Wednesday, 25 March 2009

Don't you know it's rude to point!?!?

It was a very busy day today, walking the dog, going to work, and only a little sewing time. So I helped my friend out:



She bought a beautiful dress, designer (I think - I'm hopeless - but the material was lovely) gown, and it was discounted because of the broken zipper... it's a side zip, and they sometimes can be a bit tricky for me... but gosh I'm a proper tailor now. All fixed. Can you see our beautiful big banana tree in the back ground too? The leaves are massive.

But as I'm hitting the hay in a ticky, I've titled this post with something a guy said to us as we walked passed him on the street before.

The four of us (our neighbours, Husbie and I) were walking home from tea, and I saw the two dogs I see ALL the time (two Staffies, like the one I'm looking after now) and so we all said Oh Look at the Cute Dogs! and all looked and were saying how darling they are walking towards us. And as we passed the guy and the two dogs, I smiled at him (cause I smile at him and the dogs every time I see them) and he said "Don't you know it's rude to point?" to us...

And he had his earplugs in (so obvs. didn't hear us saying how cute the dogs are and how I love seeing them) and then trod on by. I'm totally dumbfounded by this dickhead, and feel so silly that I was encouraging everyone to look at his dogs. But WHY should I feel bad and silly when HE'S so rude to say that and not even hear what we were saying?

Anyways, as I started to write my grump story, Husbie just came and told me a really NICE story from our community (I'll be quick)... Husbie just got a new scooter, we went away for a weekend, and came back to find it a little grazed and the front totally dinted... BUT someone had written a little note:

"I didn't see your scooter, and accidentally bumped it with my car, please call me asap"

And the story goes on that Husbie and this person chatted and arranged quotes and insurance and stuff... and he just came and told me then (after saying how lovely they've been, and how nice it was to leave a note, considering Husbie's scooter is only new, he would have been devo-ed to seen it dinted) that the person was like "Of course I left a note, it's not your fault, and it's how we raise our children to be honest etc"

So they're totally the BEST people in the world and in our neighbourhood... so one unhappy camper (with dogs) in canceled out with a lovely family (and totally lovely kids) in one foul swoop*.

Night night!

(*My metaphors are TERRIBLE - fowl swoop? WTF?)

3 comments:

  1. Side zippers are killer I give anyone credit or even attempts to replace a side zipper. Sounds like he need a manners class. What is our world coming to.

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  2. How wonderful he left a note - sometimes the world is lovely like that. You begin losing faith in humanity and then someone comes in and spreads a little sunshine.

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  3. foul, fowl, fell - any one of those would have been ok (sorry, had to come out of lurkdom because I just couldn't resist):

    The phrase is one of those fixed expressions that we hardly think about most of the time. It means all at once, suddenly. It’s been around in the language for at least 400 years. Shakespeare is first recorded as using it, in Macbeth: when Macduff hears that his family has been murdered, he says in disbelief:

    All my pretty ones?
    Did you say all? O hell-kite! All?
    What, all my pretty chickens and their dam
    At one fell swoop?

    The image that Shakespeare’s audience would have brought to mind at once was a falcon plummeting out of the sky to snatch its prey (like the kite for example, which was a bird of prey long before it became an aerial machine). You might guess that fell has something to do with fall, but it hasn’t. It actually means some thing of terrible evil or deadly ferocity. We now never see it outside this fixed phrase (or perhaps only occasionally in poetic use) but once it was a common word in its own right. One of its relatives is still about: felon, which comes from the same Old French source, fel, evil. Originally a felon was a cruel or wicked person; only later did the word evolve to mean a person who commits a serious crime.

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